Advertisement
Research Article

Physiological Benefits of Being Small in a Changing World: Responses of Coho Salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) to an Acute Thermal Challenge and a Simulated Capture Event

  • Timothy D. Clark mail,

    timothy.clark.mail@gmail.com

    Affiliation: Department of Forest Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

    Current address: Australian Institute of Marine Science, Townsville MC, Townsville, Queensland, Australia

    X
  • Michael R. Donaldson,

    Affiliation: Department of Forest Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

    X
  • Sebastian Pieperhoff,

    Affiliation: Centre for Cardiovascular Science, Queen's Medical Research Institute, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland, United Kingdom

    X
  • S. Matthew Drenner,

    Affiliation: Department of Forest Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

    X
  • Andrew Lotto,

    Affiliation: Department of Forest Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

    X
  • Steven J. Cooke,

    Affiliation: Fish Ecology and Conservation Physiology Laboratory, Department of Biology and Institute of Environmental Science, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

    X
  • Scott G. Hinch,

    Affiliation: Department of Forest Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

    X
  • David A. Patterson,

    Affiliation: Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Cooperative Resource Management Institute, School of Resource and Environmental Management, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada

    X
  • Anthony P. Farrell

    Affiliation: Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

    X
  • Published: June 13, 2012
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0039079

Reader Comments (0)

Post a new comment on this article