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Research Article

Clinical, Epidemiologic, Histopathologic and Molecular Features of an Unexplained Dermopathy

  • Michele L. Pearson,

    Affiliation: Division of TB Elimination, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America

    X
  • Joseph V. Selby,

    Affiliation: Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland, California, United States of America

    X
  • Kenneth A. Katz,

    Affiliation: HIV, STD, and Hepatitis Branch, Health and Human Services Agency, County of San Diego, San Diego, California, United States of America

    X
  • Virginia Cantrell,

    Affiliation: Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland, California, United States of America

    X
  • Christopher R. Braden,

    Affiliation: Division of Food, Waterborne and Environmental Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America

    X
  • Monica E. Parise,

    Affiliation: Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America

    X
  • Christopher D. Paddock,

    Affiliation: Division of High Consequence Pathogens and Pathology, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America

    X
  • Michael R. Lewin-Smith,

    Affiliation: Environmental Pathology, Joint Pathology Center, Silver Spring, Maryland, United States of America

    X
  • Victor F. Kalasinsky,

    Affiliation: Office of Research & Development, United States Department of Veterans Affairs, Washington, District of Columbia, United States of America

    X
  • Felicia C. Goldstein,

    Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America

    X
  • Allen W. Hightower,

    Affiliation: Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America

    X
  • Arthur Papier,

    Affiliation: Department of Dermatology, University of Rochester School of Medicine, Rochester, New York, United States of America

    X
  • Brian Lewis,

    Affiliation: Division of Health Studies, Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America

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  • Sarita Motipara,

    Affiliation: Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland, California, United States of America

    X
  • Mark L. Eberhard mail,

    mle1@cdc.gov

    Affiliation: Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America

    X
  • for the Unexplained Dermopathy Study Team

    Additional membership of the Unexplained Dermopathy Study Team is provided in the Acknowledgments.

    X
  • Published: January 25, 2012
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0029908

Reader Comments (23)

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Did researchers consider pre-menopausal factors

Posted by drshar90 on 26 Jan 2012 at 20:29 GMT

Since the majority of the subjects were described as "white, middle-aged, females," I wonder if any of the research considered the pre-menopausal factor. Formication has long been a well-known symptom of those who are about to menopause, although overshadowed I guess by the fun, hot flash symptom which probably fewer, and certainly non-carnivores, experience. So, was there any correlates with estrogen or progesterone levels, or time of the month, or any perimenopausal events? Were the afflicted more likely to experience formication at the end of the day or anytime of the day? The researchers seemed to rely too much on self-report of the afflicted. And, of course, lack of a control group is always bad science. There didn't seem to be an attempt to even utilize quasi-experimental methodology, possibly because Kaiser was paying anyway.

No competing interests declared.

Did researchers consider pre-menopausal factors

illuminated replied to drshar90 on 14 Feb 2012 at 14:26 GMT

That demographic covers the tetracycline generation, discoloured teeth,possibly different immunity levels. Could there be a link there?

No competing interests declared.