Advertisement
Research Article

Gender Differences in the Risk of HIV Infection among Persons Reporting Abstinence, Monogamy, and Multiple Sexual Partners in Northern Tanzania

  • Keren Z. Landman,

    Affiliation: Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America

    X
  • Jan Ostermann,

    Affiliations: Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America, Duke Global Health Institute, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America

    X
  • John A. Crump,

    Affiliations: Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America, Duke Global Health Institute, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America, Kilimanjaro Christian Medical College, Tumaini University, Moshi, Tanzania, Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre, Moshi, Tanzania

    X
  • Anna Mgonja,

    Affiliation: KIWAKKUKI (Women Against AIDS in Kilimanjaro), Moshi, Tanzania

    X
  • Meghan K. Mayhood,

    Affiliation: Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America

    X
  • Dafrosa K. Itemba,

    Affiliation: KIWAKKUKI (Women Against AIDS in Kilimanjaro), Moshi, Tanzania

    X
  • Alison C. Tribble,

    Affiliation: Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America

    X
  • Evaline M. Ndosi,

    Affiliation: Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre, Moshi, Tanzania

    X
  • Helen Y. Chu,

    Affiliation: Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America

    X
  • John F. Shao,

    Affiliations: Kilimanjaro Christian Medical College, Tumaini University, Moshi, Tanzania, Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre, Moshi, Tanzania

    X
  • John A. Bartlett,

    Affiliations: Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America, Duke Global Health Institute, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America, Kilimanjaro Christian Medical College, Tumaini University, Moshi, Tanzania, Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre, Moshi, Tanzania

    X
  • Nathan M. Thielman mail

    n.thielman@duke.edu

    Affiliations: Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America, Duke Global Health Institute, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America

    X
  • Published: August 27, 2008
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0003075

Reader Comments (2)

Post a new comment on this article

Tackling Men or Women?

Posted by rtatoud on 30 Aug 2008 at 12:17 GMT

The researchers concluded that “efforts to promote abstinence, to reduce the number of sexual partners, and to promote mutual monogamy should be coupled with methods which empower women to better control their exposure risk” and recommend “increased efforts to educate and empower women with respect to condom use” amongst other relevant strategies.

This is a rather surprising, but conventional, recommendation when it is clear that it is the men who are spreading the epidemics, not the women. Shouldn't the increased efforts be invested in educating men and empowering them to use condoms?