# wombat urls ß PLOS ONE : accelerating the publication of peer-reviewed science
Advertisement
Research Article

Ionizing Radiation Changes the Electronic Properties of Melanin and Enhances the Growth of Melanized Fungi

  • Ekaterina Dadachova mail,

    To whom correspondence should be addressed. E-mail: edadacho@aecom.yu.edu

    Affiliations: Department of Nuclear Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, United States of America, Microbiology and Immunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, United States of America

    X
  • Ruth A. Bryan,

    Affiliation: Department of Nuclear Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, United States of America

    X
  • Xianchun Huang,

    Affiliation: Department of Nuclear Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, United States of America

    X
  • Tiffany Moadel,

    Affiliation: Department of Nuclear Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, United States of America

    X
  • Andrew D. Schweitzer,

    Affiliation: Department of Nuclear Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, United States of America

    X
  • Philip Aisen,

    Affiliation: Physiology and Biophysics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, United States of America

    X
  • Joshua D. Nosanchuk,

    Affiliations: Microbiology and Immunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, United States of America, Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, United States of America

    X
  • Arturo Casadevall

    Affiliations: Microbiology and Immunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, United States of America, Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, United States of America

    X
  • Published: May 23, 2007
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0000457

Reader Comments (3)

Post a new comment on this article

Many?

Posted by Verisimilus on 23 May 2007 at 11:18 GMT

Many
http://plosone.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pone.0000457#article1.body1.sec1.p2

Is it possible to quantify "many" beyond providing a couple of examples?


RE: Many?

philspear replied to Verisimilus on 26 May 2007 at 06:38 GMT

There were many instances of the word "many," (actually about three) which one were you talking about? Quantification of the ones I saw would seem trivial to me. Many when referring to the number of fungi that make melanin, maybe, but it doesn't seem essential.


RE: RE: Many?

philspear replied to philspear on 26 May 2007 at 06:48 GMT

Sorry for the double post...

Its something that is probably broad knowledge in microbiology, and easily acessible to those interested. Might have been nice to include.

The bigger implication here to me is that this might be a property of melanin itself rather than the fungi with melanin. I don't care how many fungi make melanin. I just want to know if I could get a tan, stand in ionizing radiation and not have to eat.