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Research Article

Facebook Use Predicts Declines in Subjective Well-Being in Young Adults

  • Ethan Kross mail,

    ekross@umich.edu

    Affiliation: Psychology Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States of America

    X
  • Philippe Verduyn,

    Affiliation: Psychology Department, University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium

    X
  • Emre Demiralp,

    Affiliation: Psychology Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States of America

    X
  • Jiyoung Park,

    Affiliation: Psychology Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States of America

    X
  • David Seungjae Lee,

    Affiliation: Psychology Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States of America

    X
  • Natalie Lin,

    Affiliation: Psychology Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States of America

    X
  • Holly Shablack,

    Affiliation: Psychology Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States of America

    X
  • John Jonides,

    Affiliation: Psychology Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States of America

    X
  • Oscar Ybarra

    Affiliation: Psychology Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States of America

    X
  • Published: August 14, 2013
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0069841

Reader Comments (11)

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I Think This Should Be Talked About More. . .

Posted by LeftShoe66 on 18 Feb 2014 at 23:29 GMT

I don’t find the article all that surprising considering the information that Facebook supports. Facebook is based upon an individual, a place where people can write about their current mood, opinions, relationships, occupation/schooling, hobbies, and other things that make a person who they are. Based on the aforementioned interests, people can get friends that way. In a way, it is like a less privatized version of the various relationships we have in our daily lives on a global scale. However, Facebook also creates a sense of disconnection. A person may post a status, thinking that people will comment on it, and no one will bother to so much as even like it. Another instance could be when a user sees friend’s pictures, happy snapshots of a new car which in turn could create jealousy, sadness, and other negative response from a user in a worse financial state. Though normal this wouldn’t bother us, Facebook creates a sort of competition between its users. Those that have more likes and friends are more popular, more accepted. Those that lack may find themselves unwanted. Though that isn’t generally what Facebook is used for, it still occurs.

No competing interests declared.