Advertisement
Research Article

Texting and Walking: Strategies for Postural Control and Implications for Safety

  • Siobhan M. Schabrun mail,

    s.schabrun@uq.edu.au

    Affiliation: The University of Queensland, School of Health and Rehabilitation Science and National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Centre of Clinical Research Excellence in Spinal Pain, Injury and Health, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

    X
  • Wolbert van den Hoorn,

    Affiliation: The University of Queensland, School of Health and Rehabilitation Science and National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Centre of Clinical Research Excellence in Spinal Pain, Injury and Health, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

    X
  • Alison Moorcroft,

    Affiliation: The University of Queensland, School of Health and Rehabilitation Science and National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Centre of Clinical Research Excellence in Spinal Pain, Injury and Health, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

    X
  • Cameron Greenland,

    Affiliation: The University of Queensland, School of Health and Rehabilitation Science and National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Centre of Clinical Research Excellence in Spinal Pain, Injury and Health, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

    X
  • Paul W. Hodges

    Affiliation: The University of Queensland, School of Health and Rehabilitation Science and National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Centre of Clinical Research Excellence in Spinal Pain, Injury and Health, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

    X
  • Published: January 22, 2014
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0084312

Reader Comments (2)

Post a new comment on this article

future neck / back / hip problems?

Posted by lhansen on 23 Jan 2014 at 11:22 GMT

Along with the safety concerns, could there also be health concerns relating to spine alignment? Walking off-kilter for any length of time or holding your neck at a particular angle would seem likely to produce eventual aches and pains and in the future, possibly place a new burden on the health care system

No competing interests declared.

RE: future neck / back / hip problems?

sschabrun replied to lhansen on 23 Jan 2014 at 22:30 GMT

Although not measured in this study, it is reasonable to suggest that people who adopt this altered posture for a prolonged period of time while texting and walking might experience neck or shoulder pain. This would be an interesting area for future research, but as mentioned was not examined in our current study.

No competing interests declared.