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Research Article

Health Benefits of Reducing Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake in High Risk Populations of California: Results from the Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) Policy Model

  • Tekeshe A. Mekonnen,

    Affiliations: Department of Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States of America, Division of General Internal Medicine, San Francisco General Hospital, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States of America, UCSF Center for Vulnerable Populations at San Francisco General Hospital, San Francisco, California, United States of America

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  • Michelle C. Odden,

    Affiliation: School of Biological and Population Health Sciences, College of Public Health and Human Sciences, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon, United States of America

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  • Pamela G. Coxson,

    Affiliations: Department of Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States of America, Division of General Internal Medicine, San Francisco General Hospital, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States of America, UCSF Center for Vulnerable Populations at San Francisco General Hospital, San Francisco, California, United States of America

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  • David Guzman,

    Affiliations: Department of Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States of America, Division of General Internal Medicine, San Francisco General Hospital, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States of America, UCSF Center for Vulnerable Populations at San Francisco General Hospital, San Francisco, California, United States of America

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  • James Lightwood,

    Affiliation: Department of Clinical Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States of America

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  • Y. Claire Wang,

    Affiliation: Health Policy and Management, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, New York, United States of America

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  • Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo mail

    kdomingo@medsfgh.ucsf.edu

    Affiliations: Department of Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States of America, Division of General Internal Medicine, San Francisco General Hospital, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States of America, UCSF Center for Vulnerable Populations at San Francisco General Hospital, San Francisco, California, United States of America, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States of America

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  • Published: December 11, 2013
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0081723

Reader Comments (1)

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Devolution, entropy and sodium intakes

Posted by Padre on 18 Dec 2013 at 14:05 GMT

The education is wrong. The strategies against diseases are wrong. The fats and the sugars are foods, and are sources of our energy. We will be ill, but not from these. We started our devolution, and the salt is the number one cause of diseases, because the salt is perfect food for entropy (perfect food for disorder). We can restrain our devolution only by radical salt reduction. And not by taxes, but by strict laws, this is the only solution.
References:
Henningsen N.C.: The sodium pump and energy regulation: some new aspects for essential hypertension,
diabetes II and severe overweight. Klinische Wochenschrift 63 Suppl 3:4-8. 1985.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.g...
Abstract:
"There is a growing evidence for that in modern societies the function of the cellular sodium-potassium pump
(membrane-bound Na+ K+ ATPase) in several tissues in man cannot respond adequately to demands. This is not seen
in any other free-living vertebrates on this earth. The clearly unphysiological very high intake of sodium-chloride
(salt) and also alcohol is definitely playing an important role in the development of the common degenerating
metabolic aberrations, e.g. essential hypertension, diabetes II and severe overweight, in man. The special and
overall important role of the sodium-potassium pump for optimal cellular function and regeneration with special
reference to the vascular tissues is presented and discussed."

The floor gas sodium-potassium pump (anaerobic turbo pump) is not enough, our cells are dying. And this was
clear in 1985!

Markus Kleinewietfeld, Arndt Manzel, Jens Titze, Heda Kvakan, Nir Yosef, Ralf A. Linker,
Dominik N. Muller & David A. Hafler:
Sodium chloride drives autoimmune disease by the induction of pathogenic TH17 cells
Nature 2013 doi:10.1038/nature11868
Received 13 March 2012, Accepted 19 December 2012, Published online 06 March 2013
http://www.nature.com/nat...
From the article:
"Although we have recently elucidated many of the genetic variants underlying the risk of developing autoimmune
diseases 1, the significant increase in disease incidence, particularly of multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes,
indicates that there have been fundamental changes in the environment that cannot be related to genetic factors.
Diet has long been postulated as a potential environmental risk factor for this increasing incidence of autoimmune
diseases in developed countries over recent decades. One such dietary factor, which rapidly changed along with
the Western diet and increased consumption of processed foods or fast foods, is salt (NaCl). The salt content in
processed foods can be more than 100 times higher in comparison to similar home-made meals ..."
More facts and references:
http://www.science20.com/...
(and in comments below)

No competing interests declared.

RE: Devolution, entropy and sodium intakes

kdomingo replied to Padre on 19 Dec 2013 at 00:06 GMT

I would agree with you that the high sodium intake associated with a Western diet (high in processed foods and low in fresh fruits and vegetables) is of great public health concern. We have previously modeled the health benefits of reductions in dietary sodium as might be achieved through regulatory approaches. This manuscript might be of interest to you. http://www.nejm.org/doi/f...

No competing interests declared.

RE: RE: Devolution, entropy and sodium intakes

Padre replied to kdomingo on 19 Dec 2013 at 13:31 GMT

Thanks!

No competing interests declared.