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Research Article

Neural Correlates of Musical Creativity: Differences between High and Low Creative Subjects

  • Mirta F. Villarreal mail,

    mvillarreal@fleni.org.ar

    Affiliations: Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, CONICET, Buenos Aires, Argentina, Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina

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  • Daniel Cerquetti,

    Affiliation: Departamento de Neurología Cognitiva, Fundación contra la Lucha de las Enfermedades Neurológicas de la Infancia (FLENI), Buenos Aires, Argentina

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  • Silvina Caruso,

    Affiliation: Departamento de Humanidades y Ciencias Sociales, Universidad CAECE, Buenos Aires, Argentina

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  • Violeta Schwarcz López Aranguren,

    Affiliation: Facultad de Medicina, Universidad del Salvador, Buenos Aires, Argentina

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  • Eliana Roldán Gerschcovich,

    Affiliation: Departamento de Neurología Cognitiva, Fundación contra la Lucha de las Enfermedades Neurológicas de la Infancia (FLENI), Buenos Aires, Argentina

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  • Ana Lucía Frega,

    Affiliation: National Academy of Education, Buenos Aires, Argentina

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  • Ramón C. Leiguarda

    Affiliations: Departamento de Neurología Cognitiva, Fundación contra la Lucha de las Enfermedades Neurológicas de la Infancia (FLENI), Buenos Aires, Argentina, National Academy of Education, Buenos Aires, Argentina

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  • Published: September 12, 2013
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0075427

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Figure 2 caption

Posted by mvillarreal on 20 Sep 2013 at 16:49 GMT

Figure 2: Example of a creation during the Creative Task
The original sequence is showed at top. One performance of a high creative subject (S2 of Table1) is displayed in the middle and a single performance of a less creative subject (S19 of Table1) is displayed at bottom. In both cases the timetable recorded during the scan is shown along with the transcription in musical notation and the partial punctuations of flexibility. The letters (a), (b) and (c) denote arbitrary rhythm cell segmentations used for punctuation.

No competing interests declared.