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Research Article

An Updated Review of the Efficacy of Cupping Therapy

  • Huijuan Cao,

    Affiliations: Centre for Complementary Medicine Research, University of Western Sydney, Penrith, Australia, Centre for Evidence-Based Chinese Medicine, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, China

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  • Xun Li,

    Affiliation: Centre for Evidence-Based Chinese Medicine, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, China

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  • Jianping Liu mail

    Jianping_l@hotmail.com

    Affiliation: Centre for Evidence-Based Chinese Medicine, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, China

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  • Published: February 28, 2012
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0031793

Reader Comments (1)

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Regulatory bodies

Posted by tehmeenak on 22 Aug 2013 at 20:18 GMT

It is intriguing to note that although this widely practiced technique has been used since the ancient Greek times, that not all practitioners are registered with their governing body (British Acupuncture Council).

We admitted a 34 year old patient to our medical assessment unit, with his second episode of severe symptomatic anaemia secondary to cupping therapy.

Interestingly, there have been no documented cases of serious anaemia in British Cupping Society (BCS) trained practitioners, who recommend the use of adaptive blades which are no deeper than 2mm, advise not to use more than 5-6 cups per session and also for scars to heal in between these sessions. Often, in non-BCS practitioners, there is a perception that deeper incisions and a greater blood loss has a more therapeutic benefit.

If the regulatory body ensured all practitioners were licensed and trained to a set standard, then this may reduce the occurrence of serious adverse effects such as anaemia.

No competing interests declared.