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Research Article

Crop Pollination Exposes Honey Bees to Pesticides Which Alters Their Susceptibility to the Gut Pathogen Nosema ceranae

  • Jeffery S. Pettis,

    Affiliation: Bee Research Laboratory, USDA-ARS, Beltsville, Maryland, United States of America

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  • Elinor M. Lichtenberg,

    Affiliation: Department of Entomology, University of Maryland, College Park, College Park, Maryland, United States of America

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  • Michael Andree,

    Affiliation: Cooperative Extension Butte County, University of California, Oroville, California, United States of America

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  • Jennie Stitzinger,

    Affiliation: Department of Entomology, University of Maryland, College Park, College Park, Maryland, United States of America

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  • Robyn Rose,

    Affiliation: USDA-APHIS, Riverdale, Maryland, United States of America

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  • Dennis vanEngelsdorp mail

    dennis.vanengelsdorp@gmail.com

    Affiliation: Department of Entomology, University of Maryland, College Park, College Park, Maryland, United States of America

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  • Published: July 24, 2013
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0070182

Reader Comments (5)

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A fungus and a virus come together

Posted by Zafar-Hayat-Khan on 17 Aug 2013 at 11:02 GMT

As per Wikipedia, quoting a Bloomberg article which I was unable to locate :"News articles published in October 2010 quoted researchers who had discovered that Nosema fungus had joined with a previously unsuspected virus, Invertebrate Iridescent Virus, or IIV6, dealing test bee colonies a lethal blow. Neither the fungus nor the virus alone kill all the test group, but the two combined do. Both the fungus and the virus are found together with high frequency in hives that have suffered CCD. Final testing is in progress with field tests on colonies"

No competing interests declared.