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Research Article

Facebook Use Predicts Declines in Subjective Well-Being in Young Adults

  • Ethan Kross mail,

    ekross@umich.edu

    Affiliation: Psychology Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States of America

    X
  • Philippe Verduyn,

    Affiliation: Psychology Department, University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium

    X
  • Emre Demiralp,

    Affiliation: Psychology Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States of America

    X
  • Jiyoung Park,

    Affiliation: Psychology Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States of America

    X
  • David Seungjae Lee,

    Affiliation: Psychology Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States of America

    X
  • Natalie Lin,

    Affiliation: Psychology Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States of America

    X
  • Holly Shablack,

    Affiliation: Psychology Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States of America

    X
  • John Jonides,

    Affiliation: Psychology Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States of America

    X
  • Oscar Ybarra

    Affiliation: Psychology Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States of America

    X
  • Published: August 14, 2013
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0069841

Reader Comments (11)

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This is outstanding

Posted by ladymacbeth on 16 Aug 2013 at 07:27 GMT

It's something that we've all been saying and multiple young adults and older adults as well are affected by in. In many instances people have determined that taking a few days a week away from the site helps them to keep it all in perspective.It's gratifying to see it laid out and the way in which you arrived at the conclusions. Thank you for a very interesting item.

No competing interests declared.