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Research Article

Understanding Libertarian Morality: The Psychological Dispositions of Self-Identified Libertarians

  • Ravi Iyer mail,

    raviiyer@usc.edu

    Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, United States of America

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  • Spassena Koleva,

    Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, United States of America

    X
  • Jesse Graham,

    Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, United States of America

    X
  • Peter Ditto,

    Affiliation: Department of Psychology and Social Behavior, Irvine, California, United States of America

    X
  • Jonathan Haidt

    Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Charlottesville, Virginia, United States of America

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  • Published: August 21, 2012
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0042366

Reader Comments (2)

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Moral psychology vs truth of an ideology

Posted by mmthomas54 on 05 Jul 2013 at 05:41 GMT

First, is it possible that someone adopts an ideology because it is (or appears to be) true, and then forms his personality according to that ideology? Does your adherence to moral psychology preclude the possibility that an ideology might be true?

Second, there is confusion about moral principles. Some libertarians do not hold that individual liberty is a moral value above other moral values. Whereas, individual liberty is a right, rights are different from moral values. One has a right to be free from government-enforced charity, and yet he has a moral obligation to be charitable. Your paper doesn’t seem to include the possibility of distinguishing rights from morality.

Competing interests declared: I'm not entirely sure that I have competing interests. I think I have some objective objections of your essay.