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Research Article

Urine Bisphenol-A Level in Relation to Obesity and Overweight in School-Age Children

  • De-Kun Li mail,

    dkl@dor.kaiser.org

    Affiliations: Division of Research, Kaiser Foundation Research Institute, Kaiser Permanente, Oakland, California, United States of America, Department of Health Research and Policy, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America

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  • Maohua Miao,

    Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology and Social Science on Reproductive Health, Shanghai Institute of Planned Parenthood Research, & World Health Organization Collaborating Center for Research in Human Reproduction, Shanghai, China

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  • ZhiJun Zhou,

    Affiliation: School of Public Health, Key Lab for Public Health Safety, & WHO Collaborating Center for Occupational Health, Fudan University, Shanghai, China

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  • Chunhua Wu,

    Affiliation: School of Public Health, Key Lab for Public Health Safety, & WHO Collaborating Center for Occupational Health, Fudan University, Shanghai, China

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  • Huijing Shi,

    Affiliation: Department of Child and Adolescent Health, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai, China

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  • Xiaoqin Liu,

    Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology and Social Science on Reproductive Health, Shanghai Institute of Planned Parenthood Research, & World Health Organization Collaborating Center for Research in Human Reproduction, Shanghai, China

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  • Siqi Wang,

    Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology and Social Science on Reproductive Health, Shanghai Institute of Planned Parenthood Research, & World Health Organization Collaborating Center for Research in Human Reproduction, Shanghai, China

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  • Wei Yuan

    Affiliations: Department of Epidemiology and Social Science on Reproductive Health, Shanghai Institute of Planned Parenthood Research, & World Health Organization Collaborating Center for Research in Human Reproduction, Shanghai, China, National Population & Family Planning Key Laboratory of Contraceptive Drugs and Devices, Shanghai, China

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  • Published: June 12, 2013
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0065399

Reader Comments (2)

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BPA reduces Testosterone which Increases Obesity

Posted by jamesmhoward on 13 Jun 2013 at 11:46 GMT

Bisphenol A reduces testosterone levels (Fertil Steril. 2013: "Serum bisphenol-A concentration and sex hormone levels in men," Zhou, et al.) I submit that BPA also reduces testosterone in children.

I suggest a certain ratio of testosterone to dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is necessary for optimal gene activity in all tissues, perhaps, especially, in metabolism. If BPA reduces testosterone, then young girls would be more vulnerable to the effects of BPA than young girls. (I explain the importance of this ratio of testosterone to DHEA in "DHEA, Estradiol, Testosterone, and the Relevance of Their Ratio …The Androgen Receptor …and the Secular Trend," at: http://anthropogeny.com/A... .)

No competing interests declared.