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Research Article

The Relationship of Sugar to Population-Level Diabetes Prevalence: An Econometric Analysis of Repeated Cross-Sectional Data

  • Sanjay Basu mail,

    basus@stanford.edu

    Affiliation: Stanford Prevention Research Center, Department of Medicine, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California, United States of America

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  • Paula Yoffe,

    Affiliation: Department of Integrative Biology, University of California, Berkeley, California, United States of America

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  • Nancy Hills,

    Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States of America

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  • Robert H. Lustig

    Affiliations: Department of Pediatrics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States of America, Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States of America

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  • Published: February 27, 2013
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0057873

Reader Comments (8)

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Diagnosis Time Lag.

Posted by RaviR on 28 Feb 2013 at 20:43 GMT

If I understand the approach correctly, the data are for the 11 yr duration. (I came to this site via NYT.)

Given that the symptoms, and thus thus the diagnosis, of diabetes can take several years to show up, is there a data-set (or methodology) that can run the model/analysis with a time lag. This might even provide a stronger case for causation, if the current conclusions are true.

No competing interests declared.

RE: Diagnosis Time Lag.

sanjaybasu replied to RaviR on 28 Feb 2013 at 22:27 GMT

Some time lag were incorporated as the length of the available data allowed, as described in the SI text.

No competing interests declared.