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Research Article

Small-Bodied Humans from Palau, Micronesia

  • Lee R. Berger mail,

    Lee.Berger@wits.ac.za

    Affiliation: Institute for Human Origins and the Bernard Price Institute for Palaeontology, School of GeoSciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa

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  • Steven E. Churchill,

    Affiliation: Department of Biological Anthropology and Anatomy, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America

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  • Bonita De Klerk,

    Affiliation: Institute for Human Origins and the Bernard Price Institute for Palaeontology, School of GeoSciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa

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  • Rhonda L. Quinn

    Affiliation: Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey, United States of America

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  • Published: March 12, 2008
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0001780

Reader Comments (7)

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New taxons,island dwarfing

Posted by crowemagnon on 31 Mar 2008 at 02:08 GMT

The more we pluck morphologies formerly considered to be of erectus et al and plunk them into sapiens whether as "archaic" or "primitive" or simply as a function of our "apprehending " regional variation fully, the less justification we have for having separated off homo sapiens as a new taxon from erectus in the first place. Also, biologists tell us that the human body was designed for a much lighter weight than is common today. This means that at some time in our relatively recent past we must all have been small. Island dwarfing? I doubt it.