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Research Article

Molecular Vibration-Sensing Component in Human Olfaction

  • Simon Gane equal contributor,

    equal contributor Contributed equally to this work with: Simon Gane, Dimitris Georganakis, Klio Maniati

    Affiliation: Royal National Throat, Nose and Ear Hospital, University College London, London, United Kingdom

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  • Dimitris Georganakis equal contributor,

    equal contributor Contributed equally to this work with: Simon Gane, Dimitris Georganakis, Klio Maniati

    Affiliation: Vioryl S.A., Afidnes, Greece

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  • Klio Maniati equal contributor,

    equal contributor Contributed equally to this work with: Simon Gane, Dimitris Georganakis, Klio Maniati

    Affiliation: Neurobiology Division, Biomedical Sciences Research Centre “Alexander Fleming”, Vari, Greece

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  • Manolis Vamvakias,

    Affiliation: Vioryl S.A., Afidnes, Greece

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  • Nikitas Ragoussis,

    Affiliation: Vioryl S.A., Afidnes, Greece

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  • Efthimios M. C. Skoulakis,

    Affiliation: Neurobiology Division, Biomedical Sciences Research Centre “Alexander Fleming”, Vari, Greece

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  • Luca Turin mail

    turin@fleming.gr

    Affiliation: Neurobiology Division, Biomedical Sciences Research Centre “Alexander Fleming”, Vari, Greece

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  • Published: January 25, 2013
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0055780

Reader Comments (9)

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Could similar mechanisms work in other systems?

Posted by carrock on 28 Jan 2013 at 20:52 GMT

I find this a very interesting piece of work - one that addresses the issue of sample purity and observer differences more thoroughly than earlier studies.

There are an awful lot of olfaction receptors - presumably the shape vs vibration (vs 'other') debate is now more mature than being polarised to one or the other? Would you speculate about differential binding of these molecules to individual families of receptor? Are there any in vitro systems that could assess this?

Can 7tm receptors such as these actually 'fire' at the frequencies associated with the vibrational modes of these molecules? That would be very interesting for considering the diverse responses to chemokines (which also bind 7tm receptors) in the immune system, and although for structurally different receptors, perhaps inform us about the way in which responses to allergens are so unusual (in terms of minimal exposure triggering very large adverse effects, in a system where possession of the ligand binding molecule (IgE) only partially accounts for the response).

No competing interests declared.

RE: Could similar mechanisms work in other systems?

lucaturin replied to carrock on 30 Jan 2013 at 09:18 GMT

The question of whether other GPCRs share any part of this mechanism with olfactory ones remains open and highly speculative at this point.

No competing interests declared.

RE: RE: Could similar mechanisms work in other systems?

carrock replied to lucaturin on 30 Jan 2013 at 19:57 GMT

Fair enough, but there's 900-odd varieties of of them up your nose, one would have thought they would probably be doing something.

No competing interests declared.

RE: RE: RE: Could similar mechanisms work in other systems?

lucaturin replied to carrock on 30 Jan 2013 at 20:48 GMT

Maybe I misunderstood your question: they're definitely doing something, but whether that something applies in part or entirely to other GPCR receptors unrelated to olfaction is unclear.

No competing interests declared.