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Research Article

Molecular Vibration-Sensing Component in Human Olfaction

  • Simon Gane equal contributor,

    equal contributor Contributed equally to this work with: Simon Gane, Dimitris Georganakis, Klio Maniati

    Affiliation: Royal National Throat, Nose and Ear Hospital, University College London, London, United Kingdom

    X
  • Dimitris Georganakis equal contributor,

    equal contributor Contributed equally to this work with: Simon Gane, Dimitris Georganakis, Klio Maniati

    Affiliation: Vioryl S.A., Afidnes, Greece

    X
  • Klio Maniati equal contributor,

    equal contributor Contributed equally to this work with: Simon Gane, Dimitris Georganakis, Klio Maniati

    Affiliation: Neurobiology Division, Biomedical Sciences Research Centre “Alexander Fleming”, Vari, Greece

    X
  • Manolis Vamvakias,

    Affiliation: Vioryl S.A., Afidnes, Greece

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  • Nikitas Ragoussis,

    Affiliation: Vioryl S.A., Afidnes, Greece

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  • Efthimios M. C. Skoulakis,

    Affiliation: Neurobiology Division, Biomedical Sciences Research Centre “Alexander Fleming”, Vari, Greece

    X
  • Luca Turin mail

    turin@fleming.gr

    Affiliation: Neurobiology Division, Biomedical Sciences Research Centre “Alexander Fleming”, Vari, Greece

    X
  • Published: January 25, 2013
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0055780

Reader Comments (9)

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SOUND AND SMELL

Posted by George183 on 28 Jan 2013 at 13:26 GMT

If vibration is important to smell would that exp[lain why taste gets stronger if the sound is turned off on the TV whilst eating a meal, if taste largely depends on the smell glands?

No competing interests declared.

RE: SOUND AND SMELL

lucaturin replied to George183 on 28 Jan 2013 at 13:53 GMT

erm.. no

No competing interests declared.