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Research Article

Increased Disease Calls for a Cost-Benefits Review of Marine Reserves

  • Emma C. Wootton,

    Affiliation: Department of Biosciences, Swansea University, Swansea, United Kingdom

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  • Andrew P. Woolmer,

    Affiliation: Salacia-Marine, Pontardawe, Swansea, United Kingdom

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  • Claire L. Vogan,

    Affiliation: College of Medicine, Swansea University, Swansea, United Kingdom

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  • Edward C. Pope,

    Affiliation: Department of Biosciences, Swansea University, Swansea, United Kingdom

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  • Kristina M. Hamilton,

    Affiliation: Department of Biosciences, Swansea University, Swansea, United Kingdom

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  • Andrew F. Rowley mail

    a.f.rowley@swansea.ac.uk

    Affiliation: Department of Biosciences, Swansea University, Swansea, United Kingdom

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  • Published: December 11, 2012
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0051615

Reader Comments (2)

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Good news for lobsters

Posted by KeithHiscock on 30 Dec 2012 at 21:16 GMT

It is important to understand that there are sometimes perceived 'negative' effects of protecting a species from exploitation. However, the overwhelming take-home message from this paper seems to me that lobster populations within the No-Take Zone at Lundy are thriving and likely to benefit the fishery through export of larvae and perhaps adults displaced by overcrowding. The higher incidence of (low level) disease in large males is, well, perhaps what happens when you get older. I am surprised that a title that majored on, what I think is, a minor and unsurprising (for older animals) 'cost' passed the referees.

Competing interests declared: I was instrumental in seeing the voluntary reserve at Lundy established in 1972 and have been involved in marine conservation related work there ever since. I am Chairman of the Lundy Marine Conservation Zone Advisory Group.