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Research Article

Measuring the Meltdown: Drivers of Global Amphibian Extinction and Decline

  • Navjot S. Sodhi mail,

    *E-mail: dbsns@nus.edu.sg (NSS); dbsbdp@nus.edu.sg (DB)

    Affiliation: Department of Biological Sciences, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore

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  • David Bickford mail,

    *E-mail: dbsns@nus.edu.sg (NSS); dbsbdp@nus.edu.sg (DB)

    Affiliation: Department of Biological Sciences, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore

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  • Arvin C. Diesmos,

    Affiliations: Department of Biological Sciences, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore, Herpetology Section, Zoology Division, National Museum of the Philippines, Manila, Philippines

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  • Tien Ming Lee,

    Affiliation: Ecology, Behavior and Evolution Section, Division of Biological Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California, United States of America

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  • Lian Pin Koh,

    Affiliation: Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey, United States of America

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  • Barry W. Brook,

    Affiliation: Research Institute for Climate Change and Sustainability, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia

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  • Cagan H. Sekercioglu,

    Affiliation: Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America

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  • Corey J. A. Bradshaw

    Affiliations: Research Institute for Climate Change and Sustainability, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia, School for Environmental Research, Institute of Advanced Studies, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia

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  • Published: February 20, 2008
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0001636

Reader Comments (8)

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How does this compare to two papers cited above by McCallum

Posted by mmccallum on 19 Nov 2012 at 14:09 GMT

weak effects of mean annual temperature, annual temperature seasonality and annual precipitation seasonality (the two top-ranked models accounted for 0.354 and 0.267 of the wBIC, respectively;
http://plosone.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pone.0001636#article1.body1.sec2.p2

McCallum et al. and McCallum (provided above) demonstrated that cricket frogs and box turtles are well impacted by changes in precipitation and temperature if you account for seasonal variation. Further, a later study on box turtles in maryland supported the box turtle study. Further, previous studies (cited within above articles) demonstrate that these trends are also impacting various fishes. Therefore, it seems probable that temp and precip are very important, even if your model only weakly identified the issue.

No competing interests declared.