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Research Article

Transitions between Central and Peripheral Vision Create Spatial/Temporal Distortions: A Hypothesis Concerning the Perceived Break of the Curveball

  • Arthur Shapiro mail,

    Arthur.Shapiro@American.edu

    Affiliation: Department of Psychology, American University, Washington, D. C., United States of America

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  • Zhong-Lin Lu,

    Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, United States of America

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  • Chang-Bing Huang,

    Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, United States of America

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  • Emily Knight,

    Affiliation: Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, United States of America

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  • Robert Ennis

    Affiliation: SUNY College of Optometry, New York, New York, United States of America

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  • Published: October 13, 2010
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0013296

Reader Comments (2)

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Prior Experimental work

Posted by aux47 on 20 Oct 2010 at 12:39 GMT

There has been prior experimental work on this phenomena indicating that the ball does indeed curve and is not an optical illusion:

Effect of Spin and Speed on the Lateral Deflection (Curve) of a Baseball; and the Magnus Effect for Smooth Spheres
Lyman J. Briggs
American Journal of Physics -- November 1959 -- Volume 27, Issue 8, pp. 589-596

http://dx.doi.org/10.1119...

No competing interests declared.