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Research Article

Increasing Cropping System Diversity Balances Productivity, Profitability and Environmental Health

  • Adam S. Davis mail,

    adam.davis@ars.usda.gov

    Affiliation: United States Department of Agriculture/Agricultural Research Service, Global Change and Photosynthesis Research Unit, Urbana, Illinois, United States of America

    X
  • Jason D. Hill,

    Affiliation: Department of Bioproducts and Biosystems Engineering, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, Minnesota, United States of America

    X
  • Craig A. Chase,

    Affiliation: Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa, United States of America

    X
  • Ann M. Johanns,

    Affiliation: Department of Economics, Iowa State University Extension and Outreach, Osage, Iowa, United States of America

    X
  • Matt Liebman

    Affiliation: Department of Agronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa, United States of America

    X
  • Published: October 10, 2012
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0047149

Reader Comments (7)

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Media Coverage of This Article

Posted by asdavis1 on 22 Oct 2012 at 16:52 GMT

Please note additional media coverage of this article:

1. New York Times OpEd Page
"A simple fix for farming"
http://opinionator.blogs....

2. Wired Magazine
"Big, smart and green: a revolutionary vision for modern farming"
http://www.wired.com/wire...


Kind regards,

Adam Davis

No competing interests declared.

RE: Media Coverage of This Article

PLoS_ONE_Group replied to asdavis1 on 26 Oct 2012 at 22:41 GMT

The following article represents some of the media coverage that has occurred for this paper:

Publication: Discover Magazine 80Beats
Title: “Greener Farming Methods Can Make As Much Green As Industrial Ones | 80beats | Discover Magazine”
http://blogs.discovermaga...

Publication: Opinionator New York Times Blogs
Title: “A Simple Fix for Farming - NYTimes.com”
http://opinionator.blogs....

Publication: Press Release Iowa State University
Title: “Long-term study shows many benefits of longer rotations | Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture”
http://www.leopold.iastat...

Publication: Union of Concerned Scientists
Title: “Crop Rotation Generates Profits without Pollution (or, What Agribusiness Doesn't Want You to Know) - The Equation”
http://blog.ucsusa.org/cr...

Publication: Wired Science
Title: “Big, Smart and Green: A Revolutionary Vision for Modern Farming | Wired Science | Wired.com”
http://www.wired.com/wire...

Publication: Wired Science
Title: “Big, Smart and Green: A Revolutionary Vision for Modern Farming | Wired Science | Wired.com”
http://www.wired.com/wire...

If you see any additional coverage of this paper in the press or blogosphere, please reply to this thread and add the link to the article.

Competing interests declared: PLOS ONE Staff

RE: RE: Media Coverage of This Article

aashi replied to PLoS_ONE_Group on 04 Nov 2012 at 14:48 GMT

More media coverage:

VERLYN KLINKENBORG
From the Sunday Review in the New York Times
Title: "Crop Rotation and the Future of Farming"/"Did Farmers of the Past Know More Than We Do?"
http://www.nytimes.com/20...

No competing interests declared.

RE: Media Coverage of This Article

amerberg replied to asdavis1 on 12 Jan 2013 at 20:31 GMT

The NYT op-ed piece says that the 3-year and 4-year rotations integrated livestock into the production system. My understanding of the paper is that there were no livestock on the experimental plots, but that you assumed an integrated livestock operation would provide manure in completing the financial analyses. Does the NYT column accurately represent this aspect of the work?

No competing interests declared.

RE: RE: Media Coverage of This Article

asdavis1 replied to amerberg on 15 Jan 2013 at 18:05 GMT

We believe that the article does accurately reflect this aspect of the work. We used composted manure from the ISU Beef Nutrition Farm for a number of years, until in 2009 we switched to compost from the new university composting facility that uses manure from the ISU Dairy Farm mixed with kitchen wastes from the university food service, and landscape wastes/tree trimmings. The university takes our alfalfa hay, as well as all of the grain and straw. In our 2008 Agron J article, lead author Matt Liebman wrote that, "We estimate that the quantities of N applied in manure in this study were about 70% of what could be used on a mixed crop-livestock farm where cattle were fed with the amounts of corn and forage produced in our experimental plots (I-FARM, 2007)."

No competing interests declared.