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Research Article

Clinical, Epidemiologic, Histopathologic and Molecular Features of an Unexplained Dermopathy

  • Michele L. Pearson,

    Affiliation: Division of TB Elimination, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America

    X
  • Joseph V. Selby,

    Affiliation: Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland, California, United States of America

    X
  • Kenneth A. Katz,

    Affiliation: HIV, STD, and Hepatitis Branch, Health and Human Services Agency, County of San Diego, San Diego, California, United States of America

    X
  • Virginia Cantrell,

    Affiliation: Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland, California, United States of America

    X
  • Christopher R. Braden,

    Affiliation: Division of Food, Waterborne and Environmental Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America

    X
  • Monica E. Parise,

    Affiliation: Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America

    X
  • Christopher D. Paddock,

    Affiliation: Division of High Consequence Pathogens and Pathology, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America

    X
  • Michael R. Lewin-Smith,

    Affiliation: Environmental Pathology, Joint Pathology Center, Silver Spring, Maryland, United States of America

    X
  • Victor F. Kalasinsky,

    Affiliation: Office of Research & Development, United States Department of Veterans Affairs, Washington, District of Columbia, United States of America

    X
  • Felicia C. Goldstein,

    Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America

    X
  • Allen W. Hightower,

    Affiliation: Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America

    X
  • Arthur Papier,

    Affiliation: Department of Dermatology, University of Rochester School of Medicine, Rochester, New York, United States of America

    X
  • Brian Lewis,

    Affiliation: Division of Health Studies, Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America

    X
  • Sarita Motipara,

    Affiliation: Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland, California, United States of America

    X
  • Mark L. Eberhard mail,

    mle1@cdc.gov

    Affiliation: Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America

    X
  • for the Unexplained Dermopathy Study Team

    Additional membership of the Unexplained Dermopathy Study Team is provided in the Acknowledgments.

    X
  • Published: January 25, 2012
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0029908

Reader Comments (23)

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Morgellons comes from (the blanket with sleeves)

Posted by rdot on 01 Jul 2012 at 16:23 GMT

I have been doing my own research on this. Trying to get someone (CDC) to do more specifically on this correlation. But the 'morgellons' fibers I se are the same as the fibers that I see in my blanket with sleeves. Micro fiber Made in China. Also the morgellons 'Hot Spot' correlates nicely to the 'Snuggies interest' map. do an image search in google and look for snuggie geographic interest' click on images and look at the firt map that it shows. then go to youtube and look at http://www.youtube.com/wa... (stop at 1:21 to see the map)

No competing interests declared.