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Research Article

Adverse Metabolic Response to Regular Exercise: Is It a Rare or Common Occurrence?

  • Claude Bouchard mail,

    claude.bouchard@pbrc.edu

    Affiliation: Human Genomics Laboratory, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, United States of America

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  • Steven N. Blair,

    Affiliation: Departments of Exercise Science and Epidemiology/Biostatistics, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina, United States of America

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  • Timothy S. Church,

    Affiliation: Preventive Medicine Laboratory, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, United States of America

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  • Conrad P. Earnest,

    Affiliation: Preventive Medicine Laboratory, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, United States of America

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  • James M. Hagberg,

    Affiliation: Department of Kinesiology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, United States of America

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  • Keijo Häkkinen,

    Affiliation: Department of Biology of Physical Activity, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland

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  • Nathan T. Jenkins,

    Affiliation: Department of Kinesiology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, United States of America

    Current address: Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri, United States of America

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  • Laura Karavirta,

    Affiliation: Department of Biology of Physical Activity, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland

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  • William E. Kraus,

    Affiliation: Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America

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  • Arthur S. Leon,

    Affiliation: School of Kinesiology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States of America

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  • D. C. Rao,

    Affiliation: Division of Biostatistics, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, United States of America

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  • Mark A. Sarzynski,

    Affiliation: Human Genomics Laboratory, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, United States of America

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  • James S. Skinner,

    Affiliation: Professor Emeritus of Kinesiology, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, United States of America

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  • Cris A. Slentz,

    Affiliation: Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America

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  • Tuomo Rankinen

    Affiliation: Human Genomics Laboratory, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, United States of America

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  • Published: May 30, 2012
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0037887

Reader Comments (13)

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Study supports a link between obesity and inflammation

Posted by NewbieBC on 05 Jun 2012 at 17:44 GMT

What struck me about this article is that the inflammation and obesity trial subjects had a greater than average % adverse events. While it may be a dilemma for physicians to tell/advise individual patients if exercise is risky, these data suggest to me that obesity likely worsens inflammation due to exercise. The stress on the body is worse due to weight, and anti-inflammatory cytokines have more tissue to handle. Thus, unlike Extreme Makeover - Weight Loss edition, it may be more prudent to focus on diet first to reduce risk, and then exercise to control weight. It will be interesting to see if such a sequential approach is better, or if bariatric surgery has comparable outcomes without the adverse events.

No competing interests declared.