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Research Article

Adverse Metabolic Response to Regular Exercise: Is It a Rare or Common Occurrence?

  • Claude Bouchard mail,

    claude.bouchard@pbrc.edu

    Affiliation: Human Genomics Laboratory, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, United States of America

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  • Steven N. Blair,

    Affiliation: Departments of Exercise Science and Epidemiology/Biostatistics, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina, United States of America

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  • Timothy S. Church,

    Affiliation: Preventive Medicine Laboratory, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, United States of America

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  • Conrad P. Earnest,

    Affiliation: Preventive Medicine Laboratory, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, United States of America

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  • James M. Hagberg,

    Affiliation: Department of Kinesiology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, United States of America

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  • Keijo Häkkinen,

    Affiliation: Department of Biology of Physical Activity, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland

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  • Nathan T. Jenkins,

    Affiliation: Department of Kinesiology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, United States of America

    Current address: Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri, United States of America

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  • Laura Karavirta,

    Affiliation: Department of Biology of Physical Activity, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland

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  • William E. Kraus,

    Affiliation: Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America

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  • Arthur S. Leon,

    Affiliation: School of Kinesiology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States of America

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  • D. C. Rao,

    Affiliation: Division of Biostatistics, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, United States of America

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  • Mark A. Sarzynski,

    Affiliation: Human Genomics Laboratory, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, United States of America

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  • James S. Skinner,

    Affiliation: Professor Emeritus of Kinesiology, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, United States of America

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  • Cris A. Slentz,

    Affiliation: Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America

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  • Tuomo Rankinen

    Affiliation: Human Genomics Laboratory, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, United States of America

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  • Published: May 30, 2012
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0037887

Reader Comments (13)

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TE and cardiovascular risk

Posted by Martin_T on 31 May 2012 at 23:21 GMT

I agree with martybb - quantifying TE correctly critical. A CV of 4.1% for SBP looks very low. E.g. Marshall (2004) used 9.9% in his simulations.

What we want to achieve by exercising is a reduction in cardiovascular risk, for example as estimated by the Framingham equations. A small increase in one risk factor may not result in an increase in overall CVD risk if the others improve. The only one that is bound to get worse with exercise is age.

Marshall T. When measurements are misleading: modelling the effects of blood pressure misclassification in the English population. BMJ 2004;328;933

No competing interests declared.