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Research Article

Adverse Metabolic Response to Regular Exercise: Is It a Rare or Common Occurrence?

  • Claude Bouchard mail,

    claude.bouchard@pbrc.edu

    Affiliation: Human Genomics Laboratory, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, United States of America

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  • Steven N. Blair,

    Affiliation: Departments of Exercise Science and Epidemiology/Biostatistics, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina, United States of America

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  • Timothy S. Church,

    Affiliation: Preventive Medicine Laboratory, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, United States of America

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  • Conrad P. Earnest,

    Affiliation: Preventive Medicine Laboratory, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, United States of America

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  • James M. Hagberg,

    Affiliation: Department of Kinesiology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, United States of America

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  • Keijo Häkkinen,

    Affiliation: Department of Biology of Physical Activity, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland

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  • Nathan T. Jenkins,

    Affiliation: Department of Kinesiology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, United States of America

    Current address: Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri, United States of America

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  • Laura Karavirta,

    Affiliation: Department of Biology of Physical Activity, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland

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  • William E. Kraus,

    Affiliation: Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America

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  • Arthur S. Leon,

    Affiliation: School of Kinesiology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States of America

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  • D. C. Rao,

    Affiliation: Division of Biostatistics, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, United States of America

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  • Mark A. Sarzynski,

    Affiliation: Human Genomics Laboratory, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, United States of America

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  • James S. Skinner,

    Affiliation: Professor Emeritus of Kinesiology, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, United States of America

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  • Cris A. Slentz,

    Affiliation: Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America

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  • Tuomo Rankinen

    Affiliation: Human Genomics Laboratory, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, United States of America

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  • Published: May 30, 2012
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0037887

Reader Comments (13)

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100% Positive Response Would be Shocking

Posted by iSteeve on 31 May 2012 at 15:34 GMT

It is not a major shock that not everyone responds positively to exercise. Dr. Bouchard's earlier study (2001) pointed out the lack of changes in mVO2 in certain individuals. A study I remember reading with interest.

But, we should not make 100% response to any single intervention our goal. Overall exercise is responsible for many positive changes in health and lessens the chance and rate of significant deterioration. ""The near 90% that did well is not a minority. We should not let 8 to 12% become the new and "shocking" majority.""

I agree that we should try to discover who will have a significant adverse response to exercise. But that is often sudden death and there is no going back from that. Recent studies have shown that to be a rare event with an overall significant lessening of cardiovascular risk through an appropriately implemented exercise regimen.

As others have noted ""exercise and diet go hand in hand"". All of the individuals in this study were overweight. Improper diet is a large contributor, but not the sole contributor to the condition of being overweight or obese.

Successful implementation of an exercise program should actually include more than a mere exercise program. It needs life habits that would include good sleep habits, healthy diet, and avoiding the excessive consumption of things that are bad for you (too much alcohol, drugs, etc.).

No competing interests declared.