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Research Article

Adverse Metabolic Response to Regular Exercise: Is It a Rare or Common Occurrence?

  • Claude Bouchard mail,

    claude.bouchard@pbrc.edu

    Affiliation: Human Genomics Laboratory, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, United States of America

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  • Steven N. Blair,

    Affiliation: Departments of Exercise Science and Epidemiology/Biostatistics, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina, United States of America

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  • Timothy S. Church,

    Affiliation: Preventive Medicine Laboratory, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, United States of America

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  • Conrad P. Earnest,

    Affiliation: Preventive Medicine Laboratory, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, United States of America

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  • James M. Hagberg,

    Affiliation: Department of Kinesiology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, United States of America

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  • Keijo Häkkinen,

    Affiliation: Department of Biology of Physical Activity, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland

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  • Nathan T. Jenkins,

    Affiliation: Department of Kinesiology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, United States of America

    Current address: Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri, United States of America

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  • Laura Karavirta,

    Affiliation: Department of Biology of Physical Activity, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland

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  • William E. Kraus,

    Affiliation: Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America

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  • Arthur S. Leon,

    Affiliation: School of Kinesiology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States of America

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  • D. C. Rao,

    Affiliation: Division of Biostatistics, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, United States of America

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  • Mark A. Sarzynski,

    Affiliation: Human Genomics Laboratory, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, United States of America

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  • James S. Skinner,

    Affiliation: Professor Emeritus of Kinesiology, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, United States of America

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  • Cris A. Slentz,

    Affiliation: Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America

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  • Tuomo Rankinen

    Affiliation: Human Genomics Laboratory, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, United States of America

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  • Published: May 30, 2012
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0037887

Reader Comments (13)

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diet?

Posted by randywoolf on 31 May 2012 at 11:35 GMT

i did not see anything regarding diet changes during the increased exercise period. it is very common for people to eat more, and more 'bad' food, when they start to exercise more. did i miss it?

No competing interests declared.

RE: diet?

BrPH replied to randywoolf on 01 Jun 2012 at 01:14 GMT

According to other materials, the lead author says that the subjects did not make dietary changes.

However, that does not mean diet isn't a factor. Poor diets that don't change significantly can have profound effects with exercise. Anything from vitamin to mineral deficiencies could have major effects. One speculation for certain sudden cardiac events in high level older athletes is magnesium.

No competing interests declared.