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Research Article

Accumulation of an Antidepressant in Vesiculogenic Membranes of Yeast Cells Triggers Autophagy

  • Jingqiu Chen equal contributor,

    equal contributor Contributed equally to this work with: Jingqiu Chen, Daniel Korostyshevsky

    Affiliation: Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey, United States of America

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  • Daniel Korostyshevsky equal contributor,

    equal contributor Contributed equally to this work with: Jingqiu Chen, Daniel Korostyshevsky

    Affiliation: Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey, United States of America

    X
  • Sean Lee,

    Affiliation: Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey, United States of America

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  • Ethan O. Perlstein mail

    eperlste@princeton.edu

    Affiliation: Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey, United States of America

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  • Published: April 18, 2012
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0034024

Reader Comments (16)

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Do yeast get depressed?

Posted by hashimoto on 14 May 2012 at 04:44 GMT

I have read the manuscript. I think this paper is very interesting. The data support a serotonin transporter independent component of antidepressant sertraline. A further study using another SSRIs, including paroxetine and fluvoxamine, may be interesting. In addition, a further study on BDNF-TrkB signaling pathway as well as sigma-1 receptor chaperone will be of great interest since these pathways paly a key role in the pathophysiology of depression.

Academic Editor
Kenji hashimoto

No competing interests declared.

RE: Do yeast get depressed?

eperlste replied to hashimoto on 14 May 2012 at 22:47 GMT

Thanks for your feedback, Kenji.

We are currently studying the membrane-based pharmacology of other SSRIs as well as other psychiatric-disease drugs, like antipsychotics. Preliminary analysis suggests that there are indeed specific drug-membrane interactions, and that different pharmacological classes behave differently in yeast at the genetic level at least.

We are also looking at the BDNF-TrkB pathway as a readout of antidepressant accumulation in cellular membranes of neuronal cell lines.

No competing interests declared.