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Research Article

Novel Peptide Sequence (“IQ-tag”) with High Affinity for NIR Fluorochromes Allows Protein and Cell Specific Labeling for In Vivo Imaging

  • Kimberly A. Kelly equal contributor,

    equal contributor Contributed equally to this work with: Kimberly A. Kelly, Jonathan Carson

    Affiliation: Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America

    X
  • Jonathan Carson equal contributor,

    equal contributor Contributed equally to this work with: Kimberly A. Kelly, Jonathan Carson

    Affiliation: Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America

    X
  • Jason R. McCarthy,

    Affiliation: Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America

    X
  • Ralph Weissleder mail

    To whom correspondence should be addressed. E-mail: weissleder@helix.mgh.harvard.edu

    Affiliation: Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America

    X
  • Published: July 25, 2007
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0000665

Reader Comments (2)

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Another potential use...

Posted by iyudushkin on 14 Sep 2007 at 01:05 GMT

Certain organic dyes, including some widely used rhodamine-, BODIPY- and indocyanine-based fluorophores, sometimes exhibit unspecific sorption on cellular structures when used for live- or fixed-cell imaging. A short peptide that appears to interact with nanomolar affinity with certain fluorophores, such as the one reported in this study, would be an excellent washing reagent to decrease unspecific dye sorption and eliminate the background staining (as demonstrated in a competition expt in Fig. 6A).