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Research Article

Deficient Liver Biosynthesis of Docosahexaenoic Acid Correlates with Cognitive Impairment in Alzheimer's Disease

  • Giuseppe Astarita,

    Affiliations: Department of Pharmacology, University of California Irvine, Irvine, California, United States of America, Department of Experimental Medicine and Biochemical Sciences, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy

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  • Kwang-Mook Jung,

    Affiliation: Department of Pharmacology, University of California Irvine, Irvine, California, United States of America

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  • Nicole C. Berchtold,

    Affiliation: Institute for Brain Aging and Dementia, University of California Irvine, Irvine, California, United States of America

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  • Vinh Q. Nguyen,

    Affiliation: Department of Statistics, University of California Irvine, Irvine, California, United States of America

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  • Daniel L. Gillen,

    Affiliation: Department of Statistics, University of California Irvine, Irvine, California, United States of America

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  • Elizabeth Head,

    Affiliation: Sanders-Brown Center on Aging, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, United States of America

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  • Carl W. Cotman,

    Affiliation: Institute for Brain Aging and Dementia, University of California Irvine, Irvine, California, United States of America

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  • Daniele Piomelli mail

    piomelli@uci.edu

    Affiliations: Department of Pharmacology, University of California Irvine, Irvine, California, United States of America, Department of Biological Chemistry, University of California Irvine, Irvine, California, United States of America, Unit of Drug Discovery and Development, Italian Institute of Technology, Genoa, Italy

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  • Published: September 08, 2010
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0012538

Reader Comments (1)

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Innovative and Groundbreaking

Posted by solocar on 15 Sep 2010 at 19:18 GMT

This study is amazing because it describes a peripheral mechanism that contributes to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, a disease previously thought to reside in the central nervous system alone. The findings of Astarita and Colleagues will pave the way for future studies investigating the interaction between organs in the periphery and the brain.

No competing interests declared.