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Research Article

Recovery of a US Endangered Fish

  • Mark B. Bain mail,

    To whom correspondence should be addressed. E-mail: Mark.Bain@Cornell.edu

    Affiliation: Department of Natural Resources, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, United States of America

    X
  • Nancy Haley,

    Affiliation: Department of Natural Resources, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, United States of America

    Current address: Acton, Massachusetts, United States of America

    X
  • Douglas L. Peterson,

    Affiliation: Department of Natural Resources, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, United States of America

    Current address: School of Forest Resources, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, United States of America

    X
  • Kristin K. Arend,

    Affiliation: Department of Natural Resources, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, United States of America

    X
  • Kathy E. Mills,

    Affiliation: Department of Natural Resources, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, United States of America

    X
  • Patrick J. Sullivan

    Affiliation: Department of Natural Resources, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, United States of America

    X
  • Published: January 24, 2007
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0000168

Reader Comments (2)

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There is hope

Posted by dlusseau on 24 Jan 2007 at 15:20 GMT

Conservation biology can be quite a depressing field. Researchers working in that field report on biodiversity loss, habitat damages, population declines, and species extinctions. Issues that this field is tackling are complex and therefore their management can be without perceived benefits for long periods. It can therefore be difficult to ask people to make space for a species when they do not see the immediate pay-offs.
This paper provides a ray of hope in the gloom of endangered wildlife management. The study by Bain and colleagues show that it is possible for an endangered population to recover with consistent and patient management. It offers us a great lesson: long-term investement in species recovery can pay-off!