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Research Article

Risk for Asthma in Offspring of Asthmatic Mothers versus Fathers: A Meta-Analysis

  • Robert H. Lim,

    Affiliations: Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America, Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Children's Hospital Boston, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America

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  • Lester Kobzik,

    Affiliations: Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America, Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America

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  • Morten Dahl mail

    mordah02@heh.regionh.dk

    Affiliation: Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Copenhagen University Hospital Herlev, Copenhagen, Denmark

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  • Published: April 12, 2010
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0010134

Reader Comments (1)

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Maternal recall bias

Posted by mwjst on 25 Apr 2010 at 16:26 GMT

This effect is modest (OR 3.04 versus 2.44), but statistically significant. This demonstrates that non-genetic in utero and/or post-natal factors may play a significant role in the transmission of asthma susceptibility.
http://plosone.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pone.0010134#article1.body1.sec4.p1

Looks pretty much like a maternal recall bias - explained in more detail at http://www.wjst.de/blog/2010/04/25/clearly-biased-maternal-recall-of-asthma-in-the-family/

No competing interests declared.

RE: Maternal recall bias

mdahl replied to mwjst on 21 Aug 2012 at 11:14 GMT

It could also be that mothers to appear more acceptable to the interviewer more often reported paternal asthma than maternal asthma when their children suffered from asthma. This then could lead to an underestimation of the "maternal effect".

No competing interests declared.