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Research Article

Signs of Mood and Anxiety Disorders in Chimpanzees

  • Hope R. Ferdowsian mail,

    hferdowsian@pcrm.org

    Affiliations: Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, Washington, D.C., United States of America, Department of Medicine, The George Washington University, Washington, D.C., United States of America

    X
  • Debra L. Durham,

    Affiliation: Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, Washington, D.C., United States of America

    X
  • Charles Kimwele,

    Affiliation: Department of Veterinary Anatomy and Physiology, University of Nairobi–Kenya, Nairobi, Kenya

    X
  • Godelieve Kranendonk,

    Affiliation: AAP Sanctuary for Exotic Animals, Almere, The Netherlands

    X
  • Emily Otali,

    Affiliation: Kibale Chimpanzee Project, Makerere University Biological Field Station, Kibale, Uganda

    X
  • Timothy Akugizibwe,

    Affiliation: Uganda Program, Wildlife Conservation Society, Kampala, Uganda

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  • J. B. Mulcahy,

    Affiliation: Chimpanzee Sanctuary Northwest, Cle Elum, Washington, United States of America

    X
  • Lilly Ajarova,

    Affiliation: Chimpanzee Sanctuary and Wildlife Conservation Trust, Entebbe, Uganda

    X
  • Cassie Meré Johnson

    Affiliation: Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, Washington, D.C., United States of America

    X
  • Published: June 16, 2011
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0019855
  • Featured in PLOS Collections

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Media Coverage of This Article

Posted by PLoS_ONE_Group on 16 Dec 2011 at 20:46 GMT

The following article represents some of the media coverage that has occurred for this paper:

Publication: Los Angeles Times
Title: “Most, but not all, research on chimpanzees can end, panel says - latimes.com”
http://www.latimes.com/he...

If you see any additional coverage of this paper in the press or blogosphere, please reply to this thread and add the link to the article.

Competing interests declared: PLoS ONE Staff