Advertisement
Research Article

An Indicator of the Impact of Climatic Change on European Bird Populations

  • Richard D. Gregory mail,

    richard.gregory@rspb.org.uk

    Affiliation: The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds & European Bird Census Council, The Lodge, Sandy, Bedfordshire, United Kingdom

    X
  • Stephen G. Willis,

    Affiliation: Institute of Ecosystem Science, School of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Durham University, Durham, United Kingdom

    X
  • Frédéric Jiguet,

    Affiliation: Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle, UMR 5173 MNHN-CNRS-UPMC, CRBPO, Paris, France

    X
  • Petr Voříšek,

    Affiliation: Czech Society for Ornithology, Prague, Czech Republic

    X
  • Alena Klvaňová,

    Affiliation: Czech Society for Ornithology, Prague, Czech Republic

    X
  • Arco van Strien,

    Affiliation: Statistics Netherlands, Voorburg, the Netherlands

    X
  • Brian Huntley,

    Affiliation: Institute of Ecosystem Science, School of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Durham University, Durham, United Kingdom

    X
  • Yvonne C. Collingham,

    Affiliation: Institute of Ecosystem Science, School of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Durham University, Durham, United Kingdom

    X
  • Denis Couvet,

    Affiliation: Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle, UMR 5173 MNHN-CNRS-UPMC, CRBPO, Paris, France

    X
  • Rhys E. Green

    Affiliations: The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds, The Lodge, Sandy, Bedfordshire, United Kingdom, Conservation Science Group, Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom

    X
  • Published: March 04, 2009
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0004678

Reader Comments (1)

Post a new comment on this article

Very interesting modeling article

Posted by Cellsnbirds on 04 Mar 2009 at 15:27 GMT

Loved the article.

However, one thing that would be helpful in getting people (both scientists and laypersons) not familiar with modeling to grasp the data would be a handful of case-studies. For instance, Figure 2 groups the 124 bird species into two composites, and an overlay of the population trends or other data for one or two well-studies species from each composite would be really helpful.


RE: Very interesting modeling article

gregory1 replied to Cellsnbirds on 04 Mar 2009 at 17:06 GMT

Thanks for your positive feedback. The measured population trends of the birds and their projected range changes are given in Table S1, but the obviously the table isn't easy to read.

To summarise, the top ten bird species increasing in number and projected to increase in range in our study were; Sardinian warbler, subalpine warbler, bee-eater, cirl bunting, Cetti’s warbler, hoopoe, golden oriole, goldfinch great reed warbler and collared dove.

The top ten bird species decreasing in number and projected to decrease in range in our study were; snipe, meadow pipit, brambling, willow tit, lapwing, thrush nightingale; wood warbler, nutcracker, northern wheatear, and lesser spotted woodpecker.

You can view the individual species trends of all the birds in the paper at: http://www.ebcc.info/inde.... Just pick a spcies of interest.

So for example the downward trend of the lapwing is at:
http://www.ebcc.info/inde...

And the upward, volatile trend of the hoopoe at:
http://www.ebcc.info/inde...

I hope this help visualize the real data underlying this piece of work.


Problems with links

sunflower replied to gregory1 on 01 Feb 2011 at 10:23 GMT

Dear Gregory,

Unfortunately, I am having problems opening the links related to the view of individual species trends of all the birds, the downward trend of the lapwing and the upward, volatile trend of the hoopoe in your comment mail. It would be great if you could check on these links and if necessary send me new ones. I am also having some difficulties in understanding exactly which index climate change indicators are important for each bird species. Could you help me with that?

Thanks a lot for your help.

No competing interests declared.