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Research Article

A Low Dose of Dietary Resveratrol Partially Mimics Caloric Restriction and Retards Aging Parameters in Mice

  • Jamie L. Barger,

    Affiliation: LifeGen Technologies, LLC, Madison, Wisconsin, United States of America

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  • Tsuyoshi Kayo,

    Affiliation: LifeGen Technologies, LLC, Madison, Wisconsin, United States of America

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  • James M. Vann,

    Affiliations: Department of Medical Genetics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin, United States of America, Department of Genetics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin, United States of America

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  • Edward B. Arias,

    Affiliation: Division of Kinesiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States of America

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  • Jelai Wang,

    Affiliation: Section on Statistical Genetics, Department of Biostatistics, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, United States of America

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  • Timothy A. Hacker,

    Affiliation: Department of Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, United States of America

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  • Ying Wang,

    Affiliation: R&D Human Nutrition and Health, DSM Nutritional Products Ltd., Basel, Switzerland

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  • Daniel Raederstorff,

    Affiliation: R&D Human Nutrition and Health, DSM Nutritional Products Ltd., Basel, Switzerland

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  • Jason D. Morrow,

    Affiliations: Department of Pharmacology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee, United States of America, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee, United States of America

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  • Christiaan Leeuwenburgh,

    Affiliation: Department of Aging and Geriatrics and College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, United States of America

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  • David B. Allison,

    Affiliation: Section on Statistical Genetics, Department of Biostatistics and Clinical Nutrition Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, United States of America

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  • Kurt W. Saupe,

    Affiliation: Department of Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, United States of America

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  • Gregory D. Cartee,

    Affiliation: Division of Kinesiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States of America

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  • Richard Weindruch mail,

    rhweindr@wisc.edu (RW); taprolla@wisc.edu (TP)

    Affiliation: Department of Medicine and Veterans Administration Hospital, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, United States of America

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  • Tomas A. Prolla mail

    rhweindr@wisc.edu (RW); taprolla@wisc.edu (TP)

    Affiliations: Department of Medical Genetics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin, United States of America, Department of Genetics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin, United States of America

    X
  • Published: June 04, 2008
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0002264

Reader Comments (5)

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Non-Alcoholic Sources of Resveratrol

Posted by rseifer on 04 Jun 2008 at 20:47 GMT

For those among us who are precluded from ingesting red wine, is it known if resveratrol is present/bioavailable from red wine vinegar and grapeseed oil?? Ralph L. Seifer, Long Beach, California


RE: Non-Alcoholic Sources of Resveratrol

slasater replied to rseifer on 14 Jun 2008 at 16:40 GMT

Resveratrol is also found in unfermented grapes, and in peanuts, cranberries, blueberries, and others. See
http://en.wikipedia.org/w.... I'm not sure about it's presence in red wine vinegar as such, but suspect it's there as well.


RE: Non-Alcoholic Sources of Resveratrol

captainentropy replied to rseifer on 05 Feb 2009 at 20:36 GMT

there is a huge misunderstanding in the general public and media about resveratrol. The studies that have been done use purified resvatrol and if you look at the amounts used in animal studies that had positive effects you would need to consume perhaps 400 bottles of red wine per day to get the same dose. Based on the concentration in other sources as well it is physically impossible to get that dose naturally. And buying the pure resvertrol to get that dose would bankrupt most people. Therefore, it's simply not a realistic solution...yet. However, another paper from the Prolla and Weindruch groups show positive, perhaps even better, benefits from a mixture of extracts from Knotweed and other plants. This includes resveratrol and likely numeros variants of the chemical the plant synthesizes that could be argued are more potent than the pure res. used in these studies. But that study wasn't very large nor published in the best of journals. But it poses interesting questions. Bottom line is, don't gobble down peanuts or guzzle red wine in hopes of improving your health via an incomplete story in humans with resveratrol. We scientists are working on it but people need to dig a little deeper and not expect too much yet.