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Research Article

Prospective Genomic Characterization of the German Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O104:H4 Outbreak by Rapid Next Generation Sequencing Technology

  • Alexander Mellmann equal contributor,

    equal contributor Contributed equally to this work with: Alexander Mellmann, Dag Harmsen, Craig A. Cummings

    Affiliation: Institute of Hygiene, University Münster, Münster, Germany

    X
  • Dag Harmsen equal contributor mail,

    equal contributor Contributed equally to this work with: Alexander Mellmann, Dag Harmsen, Craig A. Cummings

    dharmsen@uni-muenster.de

    Affiliation: Department of Periodontology, University Münster, Münster, Germany

    X
  • Craig A. Cummings equal contributor,

    equal contributor Contributed equally to this work with: Alexander Mellmann, Dag Harmsen, Craig A. Cummings

    Affiliation: Life Technologies, Foster City, California, United States of America

    X
  • Emily B. Zentz,

    Affiliation: OpGen, Gaithersburg, Maryland, United States of America

    X
  • Shana R. Leopold,

    Affiliation: Institute of Hygiene, University Münster, Münster, Germany

    X
  • Alain Rico,

    Affiliation: Life Technologies, Darmstadt, Germany

    X
  • Karola Prior,

    Affiliation: Department of Periodontology, University Münster, Münster, Germany

    X
  • Rafael Szczepanowski,

    Affiliation: Department of Periodontology, University Münster, Münster, Germany

    X
  • Yongmei Ji,

    Affiliation: Life Technologies, Foster City, California, United States of America

    X
  • Wenlan Zhang,

    Affiliation: Institute of Hygiene, University Münster, Münster, Germany

    X
  • Stephen F. McLaughlin,

    Affiliation: Life Technologies, Foster City, California, United States of America

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  • John K. Henkhaus,

    Affiliation: OpGen, Gaithersburg, Maryland, United States of America

    X
  • Benjamin Leopold,

    Affiliation: Institute of Hygiene, University Münster, Münster, Germany

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  • Martina Bielaszewska,

    Affiliation: Institute of Hygiene, University Münster, Münster, Germany

    X
  • Rita Prager,

    Affiliation: Robert Koch Institute, Wernigerode Branch, Wernigerode, Germany

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  • Pius M. Brzoska,

    Affiliation: Life Technologies, Foster City, California, United States of America

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  • Richard L. Moore,

    Affiliation: OpGen, Gaithersburg, Maryland, United States of America

    X
  • Simone Guenther,

    Affiliation: Life Technologies, Darmstadt, Germany

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  • Jonathan M. Rothberg,

    Affiliation: Ion Torrent by Life Technologies, Guilford, Connecticut, United States of America

    X
  • Helge Karch

    Affiliation: Institute of Hygiene, University Münster, Münster, Germany

    X
  • Published: July 20, 2011
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0022751
  • Featured in PLOS Collections

Reader Comments (6)

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Evidence that 55989 had Shiga-toxin-producing ancestor?

Posted by mpallen on 26 Jul 2011 at 06:56 GMT

Sorry, but I have not been able to follow the logic of your argument that strain 55989 had a Shiga-toxin-producing ancestor. I understand that 55989 has an intact insertion site for the phage, but then so do most E. coli strains, including the model strain K-12. Could you explain why, in plain and simple terms, you favour

1. a scenario in which the ancestor of 55989 and the German outbreak strain gained the phage, retained it on the lineage leading to the outbreak strain, but lost it in the 55989 lineage

over

2. a scenario in which the lineage gained the phage only after the divergence of 55989.

No competing interests declared.

RE: Evidence that 55989 had Shiga-toxin-producing ancestor?

mpallen replied to mpallen on 19 Aug 2011 at 16:16 GMT

Can one of the authors of this paper respond to my comment please, as I cannot follow your logic?

No competing interests declared.