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Research Article

Ancient Skeletal Evidence for Leprosy in India (2000 B.C.)

  • Gwen Robbins mail,

    Robbinsgm@appstate.edu

    Affiliation: Department of Anthropology, Appalachian State University, Boone, North Carolina, United States of America

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  • V. Mushrif Tripathy,

    Affiliation: Department of Anthropology, Deccan College, Deemed University, Pune, India

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  • V. N. Misra,

    Affiliation: Indian Society for Prehistoric and Quaternary Studies, Deccan College, Deemed University, Pune, India

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  • R. K. Mohanty,

    Affiliation: Department of Anthropology, Deccan College, Deemed University, Pune, India

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  • V. S. Shinde,

    Affiliation: Department of Anthropology, Deccan College, Deemed University, Pune, India

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  • Kelsey M. Gray,

    Affiliation: Department of Anthropology, Appalachian State University, Boone, North Carolina, United States of America

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  • Malcolm D. Schug

    Affiliation: Department of Biology, University of North Carolina Greensboro, Greensboro, North Carolina, United States of America

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  • Published: May 27, 2009
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0005669

Reader Comments (1)

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Publisher's Note: Endnote error?

Posted by Robbinsgm on 04 Jun 2009 at 13:48 GMT

This is a more likely time for transmission of communicable diseases such as leprosy than the Late Pleistocene migrations proposed by Pinhasi et al. [8] and thus supports the interpretation of the genetic data proposed by Monot et al. [12].
http://plosone.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pone.0005669#article1.body1.sec4.p7

These two citations should be reversed. Our results support the hypothesis proposed by Pinhasi, not the one proposed by Monot.

Competing interests declared: I am the first author