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Research Article

Low-Load High Volume Resistance Exercise Stimulates Muscle Protein Synthesis More Than High-Load Low Volume Resistance Exercise in Young Men

  • Nicholas A. Burd,

    Affiliation: Exercise Metabolism Research Group, Department of Kinesiology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

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  • Daniel W. D. West,

    Affiliation: Exercise Metabolism Research Group, Department of Kinesiology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

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  • Aaron W. Staples,

    Affiliation: Exercise Metabolism Research Group, Department of Kinesiology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

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  • Philip J. Atherton,

    Affiliation: School of Graduate Entry Medicine and Health, City Hospital, University of Nottingham, Derby, United Kingdom

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  • Jeff M. Baker,

    Affiliation: Exercise Metabolism Research Group, Department of Kinesiology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

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  • Daniel R. Moore,

    Affiliation: Exercise Metabolism Research Group, Department of Kinesiology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

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  • Andrew M. Holwerda,

    Affiliation: Exercise Metabolism Research Group, Department of Kinesiology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

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  • Gianni Parise,

    Affiliations: Exercise Metabolism Research Group, Department of Kinesiology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

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  • Michael J. Rennie,

    Affiliation: School of Graduate Entry Medicine and Health, City Hospital, University of Nottingham, Derby, United Kingdom

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  • Steven K. Baker,

    Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

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  • Stuart M. Phillips mail

    phillis@mcmaster.ca

    Affiliation: Exercise Metabolism Research Group, Department of Kinesiology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

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  • Published: August 09, 2010
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0012033

Reader Comments (9)

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Sample Size

Posted by jonwilliam on 25 Oct 2010 at 02:11 GMT

Sample size is too low. The authors should do apower analsysi or atleast write hwo they came with the current sample size.


Even if the results are significant, the small sample size makes it a suspect.

No competing interests declared.

RE: Sample Size

smphillips replied to jonwilliam on 25 Oct 2010 at 14:19 GMT

Jon: As our email exchange will attest your concern here is misplaced. Adding more subjects (legs) will only reduce P and make any significant finding MORE significant (i.e., P will decline). Our approach, due to the cost of these studies, is to use the smallest sample size possible to see a significant effect. So, the cost of this type of study is prohibitive if we test too many subjects. Suffice to say that this is a proof-of-principle study and we will follow this up. Your suspicions will be put to rest; this method of training works to increase strength and hypertrophy!

No competing interests declared.