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Research Article

Genetic Signatures of Exceptional Longevity in Humans

  • Paola Sebastiani mail,

    sebas@bu.edu

    Affiliation: Department of Biostatistics, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America

    X
  • Nadia Solovieff,

    Affiliation: Department of Biostatistics, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America

    X
  • Andrew T. DeWan,

    Affiliation: Division of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, United States of America

    X
  • Kyle M. Walsh,

    Affiliation: Division of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, United States of America

    X
  • Annibale Puca,

    Affiliation: IRCCS Multimedica, Milano, Italy; Istituto di Tecnologie Biomediche – Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Segrate, Italy

    X
  • Stephen W. Hartley,

    Affiliation: Department of Biostatistics, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America

    X
  • Efthymia Melista,

    Affiliation: Center for Human Genetics, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America

    X
  • Stacy Andersen,

    Affiliation: Section of Geriatrics, Department of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine and Boston Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America

    X
  • Daniel A. Dworkis,

    Affiliation: Department of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America

    X
  • Jemma B. Wilk,

    Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America

    X
  • Richard H. Myers,

    Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America

    X
  • Martin H. Steinberg,

    Affiliation: Department of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America

    X
  • Monty Montano,

    Affiliation: Department of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America

    X
  • Clinton T. Baldwin,

    Affiliations: Department of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America, Departments of Medicine and Pediatrics, Boston University School of Medicine and Boston Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America

    X
  • Josephine Hoh,

    Affiliation: Division of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, United States of America

    X
  • Thomas T. Perls

    Affiliation: Section of Geriatrics, Department of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine and Boston Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America

    X
  • Published: January 18, 2012
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0029848

Reader Comments (4)

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Mathematical error?

Posted by dahinds on 20 Jan 2012 at 17:52 GMT

The legend for Fig. S2 says, "−log10(4/100,000) = 3.4"

In fact, -log10(40/100,000) = 3.4, indicating that the expected error rate is 10X higher than the value used in the text.

No competing interests declared.

RE: Mathematical error?

sebastiani replied to dahinds on 21 Jan 2012 at 17:00 GMT

Hi,

thank you for pointing this out. Your observation is correct and the error rate of 4 in 100,000 independent tests relates to a MBF>1,000 and not 100. Sorry for the confusion.

Note however that the selection of SNPs to be used for prediction did not rely on a specific threshold on the expected error rate but rather we used their joint predictive value to inform the model building step.

Paola Sebastiani

No competing interests declared.