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Research Article

Dominance, Politics, and Physiology: Voters' Testosterone Changes on the Night of the 2008 United States Presidential Election

  • Steven J. Stanton,

    Affiliation: Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America

    X
  • Jacinta C. Beehner,

    Affiliations: Department of Anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States of America, Department of Psychology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States of America

    X
  • Ekjyot K. Saini,

    Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States of America

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  • Cynthia M. Kuhn,

    Affiliation: Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America

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  • Kevin S. LaBar mail

    klabar@duke.edu

    Affiliation: Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America

    X
  • Published: October 21, 2009
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0007543

Reader Comments (1)

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Re: Methodology

Posted by ArborResearch on 22 Oct 2009 at 01:17 GMT

This article states that chewing gum was used, but does not indicate what was in the chewing gum, whether or not the two groups received the same chewing gum, or if chewing gum in general has any impact on saliva hormone test results.

Would the author(s) please provide more detail regarding the methodology of this research?

Thank you,
Dr. Julien Arbor

No competing interests declared.

RE: Re: Methodology

stantons replied to ArborResearch on 12 Nov 2009 at 16:43 GMT

1) We used sugar-free Trident original chewing gum.
2) All participants received the same gum.
3) Past studies have shown that sugar-free gum does not have an impact on testosterone levels measured in saliva (Dabbs, 1991). For a detailed description of the methodology used in the assessment of hormones in saliva see Schultheiss and Stanton (2009).

Dabbs, J.M. (1991). Salivary testosterone measurements: Collecting, storing, and mailing saliva samples. Physiology and Behavior, 49, 815-817.

Schultheiss, O.C., & and Stanton, S. J. (2009). Assessment of salivary hormones. In E. Harmon-Jones & J.S. Beer (Eds.), Methods in social neuroscience (pp. 17-44). New York: Guilford Press.

No competing interests declared.