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Research Article

Changes in Weight, Waist Circumference and Compensatory Responses with Different Doses of Exercise among Sedentary, Overweight Postmenopausal Women

  • Timothy S. Church mail,

    tim.church@pbrc.edu

    Affiliation: Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Louisiana State University System, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, United States of America

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  • Corby K. Martin,

    Affiliation: Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Louisiana State University System, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, United States of America

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  • Angela M. Thompson,

    Affiliation: Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Louisiana State University System, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, United States of America

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  • Conrad P. Earnest,

    Affiliation: Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Louisiana State University System, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, United States of America

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  • Catherine R. Mikus,

    Affiliation: Department of Nutrition and Exercise Physiology, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri, United States of America

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  • Steven N. Blair

    Affiliation: Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina, United States of America

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  • Published: February 18, 2009
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0004515

Reader Comments (2)

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Concern about conclusions

Posted by dchapelot on 23 Feb 2010 at 17:26 GMT

I disagree with the authors conclusion about the supposed "deceiving" effects of the 12 KKW condition. Looking at the data, it is clear that although body weight loss was lower than expected in the 12 KKW condition, it was similar to the 4 and 8 KKW as was waist circumference reduction. One explanation never raised by the authors is that the exercise load in the 12 KKW may have increased fat-free mass, explaining partly this compensatory reaction. This would be a secondary benefit of exercise in improving physical capacity (specially in type I fibres). It is true that associated with larger waist circumference reduction, this would have been a more positive result but to suggest that this study demonstrates that smaller weekly exercise loads than 3 hrs aerobic a week are better is not correct.

No competing interests declared.