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Research Article

The Cryptic African Wolf: Canis aureus lupaster Is Not a Golden Jackal and Is Not Endemic to Egypt

  • Eli Knispel Rueness,

    Affiliation: Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Synthesis, Department of Biology, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway

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  • Maria Gulbrandsen Asmyhr,

    Affiliation: Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Synthesis, Department of Biology, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway

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  • Claudio Sillero-Zubiri,

    Affiliation: Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom

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  • David W. Macdonald,

    Affiliation: Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom

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  • Afework Bekele,

    Affiliation: Biology Department, Science Faculty, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

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  • Anagaw Atickem,

    Affiliation: Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Synthesis, Department of Biology, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway

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  • Nils Chr. Stenseth mail

    n.c.stenseth@bio.uio.no

    Affiliation: Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Synthesis, Department of Biology, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway

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  • Published: January 26, 2011
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0016385

Reader Comments (4)

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Not an Egypt endemic

Posted by martino on 23 May 2011 at 09:47 GMT

While the paper has an extraordinary interest for African biogeography and wildlife conservation, I think it is necessary to stress that Canis lupaster was often considered a valid species before 1950's. This because it was sympatric with smaller golden jackals in Western Libya. So, it has never been an Egypt endemic.

No competing interests declared.