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Research Article

Failure to Detect the Novel Retrovirus XMRV in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

  • Otto Erlwein,

    Affiliation: Jefferiss Research Trust Laboratories, Section of Infectious Diseases, Wright-Fleming Institute, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, St Mary's Campus, Norfolk Place, London, United Kingdom

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  • Steve Kaye,

    Affiliation: Jefferiss Research Trust Laboratories, Section of Infectious Diseases, Wright-Fleming Institute, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, St Mary's Campus, Norfolk Place, London, United Kingdom

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  • Myra O. McClure mail,

    m.mcclure@imperial.ac.uk

    Affiliation: Jefferiss Research Trust Laboratories, Section of Infectious Diseases, Wright-Fleming Institute, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, St Mary's Campus, Norfolk Place, London, United Kingdom

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  • Jonathan Weber,

    Affiliation: Jefferiss Research Trust Laboratories, Section of Infectious Diseases, Wright-Fleming Institute, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, St Mary's Campus, Norfolk Place, London, United Kingdom

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  • Gillian Wills,

    Affiliation: Jefferiss Research Trust Laboratories, Section of Infectious Diseases, Wright-Fleming Institute, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, St Mary's Campus, Norfolk Place, London, United Kingdom

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  • David Collier,

    Affiliation: Social Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre, Institute of Psychiatry (King's College London) De Crespigny Park, Denmark Hill, London, United Kingdom

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  • Simon Wessely,

    Affiliation: Department of Psychological Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, Camberwell, London, United Kingdom

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  • Anthony Cleare

    Affiliation: Department of Psychological Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, Camberwell, London, United Kingdom

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  • Published: January 06, 2010
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0008519

Reader Comments (31)

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Verification of accuracy can be tested

Posted by npatel on 09 Jan 2010 at 21:20 GMT

The paper by Erlwein et al. seems to have generated controversy about the different methods used in sample collection and PCR than Lombardi and colleagues. Although the authors used a positive control in their assays, this issue could be clarified if both the Erlwein and Lombardi groups exchanged blinded samples from their cohorts in order to determine the level of concordance.

No competing interests declared.