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Research Article

Low-Load High Volume Resistance Exercise Stimulates Muscle Protein Synthesis More Than High-Load Low Volume Resistance Exercise in Young Men

  • Nicholas A. Burd,

    Affiliation: Exercise Metabolism Research Group, Department of Kinesiology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

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  • Daniel W. D. West,

    Affiliation: Exercise Metabolism Research Group, Department of Kinesiology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

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  • Aaron W. Staples,

    Affiliation: Exercise Metabolism Research Group, Department of Kinesiology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

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  • Philip J. Atherton,

    Affiliation: School of Graduate Entry Medicine and Health, City Hospital, University of Nottingham, Derby, United Kingdom

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  • Jeff M. Baker,

    Affiliation: Exercise Metabolism Research Group, Department of Kinesiology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

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  • Daniel R. Moore,

    Affiliation: Exercise Metabolism Research Group, Department of Kinesiology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

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  • Andrew M. Holwerda,

    Affiliation: Exercise Metabolism Research Group, Department of Kinesiology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

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  • Gianni Parise,

    Affiliations: Exercise Metabolism Research Group, Department of Kinesiology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

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  • Michael J. Rennie,

    Affiliation: School of Graduate Entry Medicine and Health, City Hospital, University of Nottingham, Derby, United Kingdom

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  • Steven K. Baker,

    Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

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  • Stuart M. Phillips mail

    phillis@mcmaster.ca

    Affiliation: Exercise Metabolism Research Group, Department of Kinesiology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

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  • Published: August 09, 2010
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0012033

Reader Comments (9)

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New study information

Posted by overfiftylifter on 09 Jul 2011 at 03:49 GMT

I see that you have I believe a more recent study that demonstrated muscle protein synthesis could be motivated with a whey product 24 hours post resistance training using a low load. Is there a study using the lower load training over a longer period of time to test for actual measured skeletal muscle hypertrophy rather than just the signaling and protein synthesis? And if this study is underway or completed approximately when do you expect publication?

No competing interests declared.