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Research Article

A Comparison of Wood Density between Classical Cremonese and Modern Violins

  • Berend C. Stoel mail,

    B.C.Stoel@lumc.nl

    Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Division of Image Processing, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands

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  • Terry M. Borman

    Affiliation: Borman Violins, Fayetteville, Arkansas, United States of America

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  • Published: July 02, 2008
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0002554

Reader Comments (5)

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Other factors in violin sound quality?

Posted by JWTang49 on 17 Jul 2008 at 14:59 GMT

This is an interesting paper that uses modern technology to investigate an old question.

However, as a former violinist, I know that other components of a violin, such as the type of strings (gut or steel), the bow tension and angle of bowing, the position of the bridge, the nature of the chin/shoulder rest, even the amount and type of resin used on the bow, can all ultimately affect the quality and nature of the sound produced by a violin. Of course the biggest factor is the talent and skill of the violinist him/her-self.

Given all of this, this paper was still very enjoyable to read.

Julian W Tang
Hong Kong SAR


RE: Other factors in violin sound quality?

terryborman replied to JWTang49 on 30 Jul 2008 at 03:43 GMT

Dear Mr. Tang,

Thank you for your interest in our work. Assuredly it would be naive on anyone's part to think that any one aspect of the hundreds that make up a quality instrument would determine the final result; it's more likely that one of those hundreds of pieces, poorly executed would have more negative impact! There is a story that after a concert Jascha Heifetz was approached by a member of the audience that commented how wonderful his violin sounded to which Heifetz opened the lid of his violin case and inch and responded "I don't hear anything".

Sincerely,
terry borman