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Research Article

ABO Blood Group and Incidence of Skin Cancer

  • Jing Xie,

    Affiliations: Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America, Clinical Research Program, Department of Dermatology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America

    X
  • Abrar A. Qureshi,

    Affiliations: Clinical Research Program, Department of Dermatology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America, Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America

    X
  • Yunhui Li,

    Affiliation: Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America

    X
  • Jiali Han mail

    jiali.han@channing.harvard.edu

    Affiliations: Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America, Clinical Research Program, Department of Dermatology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America, Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America

    X
  • Published: August 04, 2010
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0011972

Reader Comments (1)

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Questions Raised

Posted by BillieYi on 07 Dec 2011 at 01:11 GMT

It's interesting that the results did come up the way it did, where there was an apparent correlation with non-O blood type and reduced risk of BCC and Melanoma.

However, we think that the case-study could be greatly improved with a higher diversity. Not just in ethnicity, but also on a population not just geared to health professions.

No competing interests declared.